*Disclaimer: I am using the images for research and education purposes and not for profit. If however they do breach copyright please let me know and I will remove them. Thanks.*

Now, for anyone who lives around Dulwich, these pictures will not be new. Assuming you have some level of awareness as you walk around, you will have seen these pictures. But nevertheless I want to share them with the wider world because a), I think they are great. I really appreciate them as pictures in their own right. And b) I especially love them in the context that they are in; literally on the side of the road. Graffiti is controversial in terms of whether people as a whole appreciate it as ‘art’ or not, and appreciate its presence full stop, but I don’t think any such arguments can be imposed on the following pieces of art, because all they do is brighten up the place and give it some real character.

First, an artist called Stik. He was commissioned by the Dulwich Picture Gallery to adapt famous paintings into his own iconic style, one that particularly seems reminiscent to me of the Cyanide and Happiness comics. The two immediately below are adaptations of Gainsborough’s ‘Mrs Elizabeth Moody with her sons Samuel and Thomas’, the archetypal brief painting title, and ‘Couple in a Landscape.’

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This next one is the one I am most familiar with, because it is on the corner of Townley and Beauval Road, so I walk past it all the time. It is an interpretation of Pieter Coecke van Aelst’s (what a name) Adam and Eve, depicting the moment Eve tempts Adam with the apple. The apple has sadly now disappeared, it lasted a year (which is pretty good going, both for being an apple and for being a removable part of an art installation) but the painting is still easily recognisable, and I quite like the added need for imagination. It has been noted that despite having simply sticks for arms and legs, and no attempt at noses or mouths at all, the figures are able to portray an exceptional amount of emotion. Art at its most simple, and, simultaneously, complex.

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And finally, Alfred Hitchcock. I’ve tried and tried to find who did this, but all I could find was ‘AP’. Don’t sue me please. The bottle of ketchup at his feet, combined of course with the knife in his hand, is a nod to ‘Psycho’, despite a brand of chocolate sauce being used as blood in the famous shower scene. I particularly like that his head is not defined, and blends into the white background. The detail on his shirt, you can see the creases, the shine on his shoe, the subtle glimmer of the knife; the whole effect is incredible. This has to be my favourite.

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